Last edited by Mekree
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Eleanor Coade found in the catalog.

Eleanor Coade

John Havill

Eleanor Coade

artificial stone manufacturer : born Exeter 1733 and died London 1821

by John Havill

  • 347 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by J. Havill (102, Quarry Lane, Heavitree, Exeter, EX2 5PP in Exeter) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Coade, Eleanor.,
  • Stone, Artificial.,
  • Women in business -- England -- Biography.

  • Edition Notes

    Cover title.

    StatementJohn Havill.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTP871
    The Physical Object
    Pagination106leaves :
    Number of Pages106
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19316380M

      The Coade factory exhibited at the Society of Artists throughout the s and s with the items on display under the name of “Miss Eleanor Coade, sculptor” – this was a proprietorial rather than actual creative attribution, as the designs were probably all by John Bacon.   A bill from Eleanor Coade dated shows that she was paid £48 14s 4½ d for modelling a frieze for the Edward IV monument and a gothic font in St George’s Chapel [SGC XIV//7]. The font itself is described in the catalogue of works of the Coade factory.

    Her surname has been transcribed as Coade and as Goade. Children's christenings are given in the FamilySearch 'pilot site', all at North Hill. Mother's name is only stated for those from Sources. Source: S35 Abbreviation: IGI (from book of transcripts) Title: IGI (from book of transcripts of parish records/ bishop's transcripts). The book also considers women’s role as producers, that is, creators of objects that were collected. Detailed examination of the artefacts—both visually, and in relation to their historical contexts—exposes new ways of thinking about collecting in relation to the arts and sciences in eighteenth-century Europe. Eleanor Coade, John.

      Coade stone was a mixture of white clay, crushed ceramic (“grog”), flint, sand, and glass. The mix was poured into moulds before being fired in kilns. Eleanor Coade senior called her product “lithodiprya,” meaning “stone twice fired” because of the recycled grog . Books. Latest books Search books. Trending. Members. Current visitors New profile posts Search profile posts Top Posters of the Month. Log in. What's new Search. Search. Search titles only Eleanor Coade: 19th century owner of a Geo-polymer recipe. Thread starter CyborgNinja;.


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Eleanor Coade by John Havill Download PDF EPUB FB2

Eleanor Coade: | | | |Eleanor Coade| | | | | Born World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most. Eleanor Coade was born in Exeter in Junethe daughter of a wool merchant. In the mids, after the family had moved to London, she set up in business in the City, selling linen.

After her father’s death inshe bought the premises of an ailing business run by Daniel Pincot at Narrow Wall, Lambeth, which was making a type of. Eleanor Coade was born on 3 June in Exeter, Devon. She was the daughter of George Coade, a wealthy, non-conformist wool merchant, and his wife, Elizabeth Enchmarch.

Eleanor had a younger sister, Elizabeth. Inthe family fortunes changed when George was declared bankrupt and they relocated to London. Mrs Eleanor Coade () was a remarkable woman whose life and achievements went largely unsung until recently (and Landmark’s restoration has gone a long way to redressing this).

Eighteenth-century business women are few, and even those we know of were almost always wives or widows carrying on their husband’s business. There is a marvellous book on Eleanor Coade by Alison Kelly, "Mrs Coade's Stone". The site of the Coade works, on the South Bank between what are now the Festival Hall and the Hayward Gallery, was identified in when the Festival of Britain site was cleared.

A circular pattern in the pavement ourside marks where one of the factory's horse. ** POSTPONED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS** Coade is an artificial stone that was invented in the 18thC. Widely used for freestanding statuary and monuments, architectural detailing and even garden furniture.

This lecture tells the story of Mrs Coade and the artificial stone that made her one of the most successful businesswomen in the late ’s. Eleanor Coade helped met morph Britain into the industrial age.

She was the right woman in the right place at the right time, as was Adam the right man. They were both responding to the fusion of the revolutionary trends in industry and political thought with the new neo-classical movement in architecture.

Kelly developed a great interest in the life of Eleanor Coade, the inventor of Coade stone, who like her was an independent woman and a self-starter. She studied Belmont House in Lyme Regis where Coade had once lived and entered into a correspondence of years about Coade with the author John Fowles, the then owner of the house.

When Eleanor Coade finally died at her home in Camberwell inshe did not leave the business to Croggon, and he had to buy it from her heirs.

He also acted as agent for her executors, selling her house and the properties she had built near Westminster Bridge, including the gallery. Inthe Library received, as a bequest, the research and teaching slides of Alison Kelly, an expert on the work of Eleanor Coade.

These slides complement another of our collections, London Architecture Online. Eleanor Coade was a brilliant businesswoman who, in the late eighteenth century, developed a formula for the manufacture of artificial stone.

Eleanor Coade, an English manufacturer, was born June 3, Coade was a pioneer in manufacturing artificial stone for use in monuments, which she called Coade stone. There had been other artificial stones before Coade stone, but they were not very satisfactory – neither the stone nor the manufacturers survived.

Eleanor Coade set up in business manufacturing artificial stone inworking with all the eminent Georgian architects including Soane, who used a frieze described as 'no. ' in one of his earliest dated buildings, a house at Adam's Place, Southwark in Coade stone in Georgian architecture - Volume 28 - Alison Kelly.

3 Mrs Nancy Valpy’s recent researches have brought to light the names of several hitherto unknown makers active for short periods in Eleanor Coade’s early years. Mrs Valpy studied the entries in the Daily Advertiser, an advertising paper which exists in a complete run only in the Library of Congress in Washington.

Author: Eleanor Coade (British, –) Subject of book: Coade's Artificial Stone Manufactory (London) Publisher: J. Strahan (London) Published in: London.

Date: Medium: Illustrations: etching, engraving. Dimensions: 9 1/16 x 11 11/16 x 1 1/8 in. (23 x x cm) Classification: Books.

Credit Line: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, Eleanor Coade was a pioneer: a pioneering businesswoman who sold a pioneering artificial stone to the front-rank architects of her day. Examples of this work can be found all across England – from the Georgian terraces of London to the great country houses of the late-eighteenth century, from Buckingham Palace to Brighton Pavilion.

Buy Mrs. Coade's Stone First Edition by Kelly, Alison (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 1.

Eleanor Coade has appeared in the following books: At Home: A Short History of Private Life. Eleanor Coade was actually born in Exeter. The house in Lyme Regis -originaly known as Bunter's Castle, but now called Belmont - was transfered from her uncle Samuel to Eleanor in Decem at PM Unknown said.

set of the Coade firm's record books, and together they form the largest group of Coade records known to survive. They date in the main from late to late Besides three manuscript volumes containing letter copies, accounts and orders with work notes, there are a few papers relating to Eleanor Coade Jr's personal properties.

Belmont is Listed Grade II*. It once belonged to the remarkable businesswoman, Mrs Eleanor Coade. Owner from of an artificial stone manufactory in Lambeth, Mrs Coade devised a formula to mass produce architectural embellishments and statuary of the highest quality. Coade stone: | | ||| | Father Thames, a Coade stone sculpture by |John Bacon| World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias.Eleanor Coade (3 June – 16 November ) was a British businesswoman known for manufacturing Neoclassical statues, architectural decorations and garden ornaments made of "Lithodipyra" (Coade stone) for over 50 years from until her should not be confused with her mother, also named Eleanor.

Lithodipyra ("stone fired twice") was a high quality, durable moulded .William Croggon (fl. ), a manager at the Coade Artificial Stone Manufactory in Lambeth, bought the business after Eleanor Coade's death in and made Coade stone for decorative work at Buckingham Palace and other sites, with a second manufactory listed a New Road St Pancras in directories afterbut went bankrupt in